Photo

SHES IS BEYOND BEAUTIFUL! 

SHES IS BEYOND BEAUTIFUL! 

(Source: therealvintagehoochie, via eyes4eyes)

Photo
so-i-became-a-dancer:

Handknit Steel Gray Infinity Scarf by LeftyLindsey

so-i-became-a-dancer:

Handknit Steel Gray Infinity Scarf by LeftyLindsey

Photo
so-i-became-a-dancer:

Yeah bitch, Why don’t you just put your damn foot on the fucking bottle. It’s not like anyone was gonna drink the damn wine or anything. I mean there is a fucking glass next to you, you daft bimbo. Maybe I wanted that wine. Maybe I wanted to kick back with some cheesecake, How I Met You Mother and some wine, but Noooo. This bitch has to go and tightrope all over it. What am I supposed to do, drink the shit? You know that shit has athlete’s foot all over that damn bottle now. Fuckin bitch, what the fuck? Inconsiderate hoe. Shit.

I had some anger issues apparently.

so-i-became-a-dancer:

Yeah bitch, Why don’t you just put your damn foot on the fucking bottle. It’s not like anyone was gonna drink the damn wine or anything. I mean there is a fucking glass next to you, you daft bimbo. Maybe I wanted that wine. Maybe I wanted to kick back with some cheesecake, How I Met You Mother and some wine, but Noooo. This bitch has to go and tightrope all over it. What am I supposed to do, drink the shit? You know that shit has athlete’s foot all over that damn bottle now. Fuckin bitch, what the fuck? Inconsiderate hoe. Shit.

I had some anger issues apparently.

Photo
eyes4eyes:

interesting..

eyes4eyes:

interesting..

Video

so-i-became-a-dancer:

They are both named Anna and I love them.

Chat

Stephanie's Interview with Lauren Linscott (Friend and former member of Columbia's Feminist Group)

  • Stephanie Kosgard: Which current Women’s Rights issues are most important to you?
  • Lauren Linscott: I really really have been frustrated on all the conflict regarding planned parenthood and how the government is even questioning our right to have insurance covered birth control. Considering so many women take it not solely for contraception, but rather for hormonal imbalances and other reasons. People misunderstanding and shaming for "promiscuity" could lead women to much less effective and more dangerous methods to try and keep themselves out of trouble.
  • Stephanie Kosgard: Do you think that global Women’s Rights issues are overlooked in the United States?
  • Lauren Linscott: I think that they are paid attention to on a very superficial level, but not to as deep an extent that other political issues have been brought to light.
  • Stephanie Kosgard: What would you like to see Columbia do to increase awareness and support for Women’s Rights?
  • Lauren Linscott: I think for awareness to be increased, the Feminist organization needs to do a much bolder job in reaching out to new students and educating them better.
  • Stephanie Kosgard: How can Columbia students become informed about Women’s Rights?
  • Lauren Linscott: If Columbia organizations were to host more lectures, and students were to be more open to the idea of educating themselves on Women's Rights.
  • Stephanie Kosgard: What can Columbia students do to support Women’s Rights?
  • Lauren Linscott: They can stand up to any unequal treatment they witness on campus, they can attempt to inform peers when misinformation is being spread, and they can better open the communication channels to allow for better understanding.
Link

Nick’s Article

Link
Chat

My Interview with Mary...

  • Lindsey Lee: As you may know April is Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention month. Many women keep quiet about being assulted, but do you think that more women are being educated about Sexual Assault in America as apposed to other countries such as China and Africa? Do you think more people speak out on this issue in America?
  • Mary McGinnis: Women are being educated about sexual assault more in America (the US) than in China and Africa because it's not as taboo of a topic in the US. More people speak out on this issue because there are governmental regulations in place clearly making sexual assault a crime.
  • Lindsey Lee: Right now in China, there are not any laws that protect women from domestic abuse. In your opinion, what are the first steps to change this?
  • Mary McGinnis: The first steps would be to create laws. Women need to form organizations that work towards making domestic abuse a crime and making it clear that women are no one's property.
  • Lindsey Lee: How do you think Rape is dealt with in countries like China? Africa?
  • Mary McGinnis: I believe it is handled as a crime against the woman's father/husband--basically, like a property crime. Or the woman is treated as though she had dishonored her family--like it's her fault. I haven't researched rape in these areas, but I bet those ways are how it is handled.
  • Lindsey Lee: Do you believe that all careers are "Women's Work?" Are there some careers that women cannot do?
  • Mary McGinnis: I believe that all work is "women's work," and women can do any job they set out to do. Some jobs may be better suited to one person or another, but there are always exceptions to disprove the rules.
  • Lindsey Lee: Nearly 70% of school dropouts in China are women. How do you think discrimination in Education and Employment differ in America and China?
  • Mary McGinnis: Women aren't valued in China--they have a huge rate of female infanticide or selective abortion, so their population is becoming disproportionately male. The United States, again, has governmental regulations to prevent discrimination against women in education and employment. I'm not sure if China does, but also, women are looked down upon in that society, so it is difficult for women to break through a glass ceiling or get equal treatment in the classroom.
  • Lindsey Lee: Female genital mutilation is a large issue in Africa. It is looked on as a ritual and a right of passage for a woman in that society. Is there a limit to when action should be taken against this? Is there a way for other countries to help (ex: clean medical supplies)? Should people speak out on this issue?
  • Mary McGinnis: FGM is a very thorny issue--many African women resent Western women coming in to tell them how to handle the issue. The best thing Western countries can do is support the African women's organizations who are working to change/end FGM. Many have revised the way FGM is practiced, so the girls being surgerized are symbolically castrated or have a tiny incision made on the clitoral hood to begin ending the practice and still complete a rite of passage. Other countries can help out by giving refuge to women who leave their country to avoid FGM, and/or other countries can actively work to prevent the practice from coming into their own borders. It's definitely important for people to be educated on this issue.
  • Lindsey Lee: What is your opinion on "bride prices" or "dowries" in Africa which results in arranged marriages?
  • Mary McGinnis: Bride prices and dowries are just another representation (and reinforcement) of women as property of their fathers and husbands.
  • Lindsey Lee: A hot topic in America right now is that of Reproductive Rights. Do you think that all women should have access to safe and affordable contraceptives? Also, do you think sexual health clinics such as Planned Parenthood are effective and helpful in this society?
  • Mary McGinnis: All women should have access to safe and affordable contraceptives and abortions. Again, this all ties back to women having ownership over their own bodies and choosing what to do with their own bodies. LEGITIMATE sexual health clinics, like PP, are effective and helpful. There are many fake clinics out there that abuse women who they think are seeking abortions. Planned Parenthood helps prevent pregnancies and prevent/treat STDs and provides cancer screenings (breast exams and pap smears) and fertility advice to women (or men) who otherwise could not afford it.
Link

Stephanie’s Website